American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA)

NATIONAL LINKS & RESOURCES (Updated 9/14/09)
   
  Recovery.govClicking this link will open a new browser window and take you off the department's Web site.
This site is the clearinghouse main page for ARRA information where other federal agencies, including U.S. Department of Labor and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, have stimulus funds available for schools.
   
  Ed.govClicking this link will open a new browser window and take you off the department's Web site.
The U.S. Department of Education (USED) will decide who will receive award grants and contracts. Sometimes the money will go to a state government; other times, the funds will go directly to a school contractor, or other organization. Use the link above for the most up-to-date information from the USED.
   
 

U.S. Department of Education Guidance/Resources (Added 9/14/09)
The U.S. Department of Education has released updated use of funds guidance for ESEA Title I and IDEA funds under ARRA. These are very helpful in thinking about how you can use multiple funding sources to support broad efforts for improving instruction and student achievement levels like Response to Intervention (RtI).

   
 

State Fiscal Stabilization Fund (SFSF)Clicking this link will open a new browser window and take you off the department's Web site.
The SFSF program is a new one-time appropriation of $53.6 billion under the ARRA 2009. These funds are largely at the governor's discretion.

  • School ModernizationClicking this link will open a new browser window and take you off the department's Web site.
    Funds from the State Fiscal Stabilization Fund in Division A of the ARRA 2009 may be used "for modernization, renovation, or repair of public school facilities and institutions of higher education facilities" [page 166, Sec. 14002(b)]. These funds are at the governor's discretion. The School Construction Tax Credits in Division B of the ARRA - also cited as the American Recovery and Reinvestment Tax Act of 2009 (ARRTA) - may be used for "the construction, rehabilitation, or repair of a public school facility, or for the acquisition of land on which such a facility is to be constructed" [page 166, Sec. 14002(b)].
   
 

Title I, Part A Recovery Funds for Grants to Local Education Agencies Fact Sheet
The ARRA provides new funding for programs under Title I, Part A of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (Title I). Title I supplements State and local funding for low-achieving children, especially in high-poverty schools. The program finances the additional academic support and learning opportunities that are often required to help academically disadvantaged students progress along with their classmates. NOTE: This PDF version of the fact sheet duplicates the information contained on the USED Web site. View the Web version of the Fact Sheet.Clicking this link will open a new browser window and take you off the department's Web site.

  • Most of the funds (95%) from the Title I school Improvement grant (Section 1003 (g)) are allocated to districts for the implementation of school improvement strategies that address the academic achievement problems that caused the eligible Title I school to be identified for school improvement. There are currently 60 Title I schools that will be in school improvement in SY 2009-2010 and who will be eligible to receive these funds. View the list of the 60 Title I schools.
   
 

IDEA Recovery Funds for Services to Children and Youths with Disabilities Fact SheetClicking this link will open a new browser window and take you off the department's Web site.
The ARRA of 2009 appropriates significant new funding for programs under Parts B and C of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA).

   
 

Education Jobs and Reform Fact SheetClicking this link will open a new browser window and take you off the department's Web site.
Within the education sector, "the Act" will provide an immediate stimulus to the economy by saving or creating hundreds of thousands of early childhood, K-12 and higher education jobs in states across America that are at risk of state and local budget cuts.

Page Last Updated on February 25, 2014