Standard 2

STANDARD 2
 

A qualified professional facilitates WBL activities as identified in the Vermont Work Based Learning Guide. 

  • WBL Coordinators complete a Department of Education approved training program.
  • WBL Coordinators have clearly defined job descriptions and high quality supervision.

INDICATOR: WBL Coordinators demonstrate proficiency and understanding of the Vermont Gold Standards for Work Based Learning and WBL Guide.

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High quality
WBL opportunities require planning and are carried out by
trained and qualified individuals either based at the school
or working on behalf of the school through an intermediary
organization in the community. In Vermont there are people
serving as WBL coordinators who function in a number of
different capacities. For example within middle and high
schools and career and technical centers there are certified
co-op coordinators, school-to-work coordinators, special
educators, career class instructors, guidance staff, service
learning coordinators and others who may serve this function.
Partner non-profits or human service agencies may employ
career development staff, employment specialists, job
placement or internship coordinators and the like. Whoever is
responsible for helping to support students and employers
with setting up quality learning experiences in the community
should in any case be well prepared to make these experiences
successful and safe. This manual serves as a guiding
framework for defining not only the roles and
responsibilities of the coordinator, but also the
elements of quality program planning and
implementation.



 

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WBL
COORDINATOR ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES




 

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These
services may include:






 

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BACKGROUND
CHECKS




 

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School
district policy may require a Criminal Background Check be
completed on any person who directly works or volunteers with
youth. Consult with school administrators regarding this
issue. This may apply to a variety of WBL activities.



 

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PLANNING



 

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Planning
should be built on best practices and take advantage of
programs with a track record of success.
 If your
district is already doing community service work, start
there. If co-op career and technical education is already
working, expand from that point. To find out what is
already in place, districts can survey and then compile a
simple database of work-based learning opportunities, staff
responsible, employers engaged, and students involved.
Often there are more work-based learning opportunities
going on than most people realize. By starting with an
accurate picture of your baseline, you will have completed
the first step in the development and implementation of a
high quality, sustainable plan.



Planning
is essential in creating good work-based learning
opportunities.
Successful planning discussions often
begin with these two questions: "Why are we doing this?"
and "How will work-based learning help students meet
academic standards and acquire 21st century skills". One
answer is that work-based learning is a wonderful
opportunity for schools to involve the whole community in
the exciting task of effectively preparing all students for
career and college success. Communities can help schools
expand the walls of their classrooms to enable students to
access high-quality applied learning environments that
support deep and connected learning.



It can
be very helpful to develop a local advisory team
responsible for planning and implementing work-based
learning.
Consider establishing an advisory team,
comprised of committed individuals from business, labor,
community agencies, legal and other professional fields,
parents, students and teachers, to assist with planning and
implementing WBL. Broad representation from the community
can make the difference between success and failure.
Ask your regional workforce partnership or other
organizations committed to helping youth prepare for
adulthood for assistance and support. Give members real
tasks and responsibilities. Empower this team with the
authority and resources to develop a vision and make it a
reality.



Become
knowledgeable about what others are doing.
Gather
information about successful work-based learning
opportunities and observe good practices in action; then
incorporate what you can into your own plans and
activities. Collaborate with other schools or districts in
your region. Be open and willing to share both successes
and missed opportunities. Although it is important that
districts develop materials that meet their own needs, it
is also important to recognize the value of standardizing
procedures and forms. Standardization minimizes confusion
and maximizes consistency, especially with work sites that
participate in work-based learning with several educational
organizations.





 

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IMPLEMENTATION



 

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Classroom
Activities: Supporting Work-Based Learning
Experiences


Successful work-based learning activities enable students
to explore their career interests and develop new skills.
The following tools may help students in this
process:




Learning
Objectives


Learning objectives are an essential part of a work-based
activity and include the specific skills to be learned on
the job and in the classroom. The objectives to be achieved
through a WBL experience should be mutually developed by
the coordinator, the student, and the employer. Learning
objectives:




Connecting
WBL to the Classroom


The work-based learning coordinator collaborates with
classroom teachers to facilitate connections between
students' work-based learning experiences and their
classroom work and assignments. The coordinator may:




Classroom
Seminars


Seminars can provide students with the opportunity to gain
insights into the culture and environment of work,
reinforce the connections between classroom content and
work related learning, and discuss common job-related
experiences. Seminars may include:






 

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SETTING
UP WORK-BASED LEARNING SITES




 

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Developing
appropriate work site placements for students is critical to
the success of each work-based learning activity.



 

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Research
Employers




Have
Effective and Consistent Communication


Effective communication is the foundation for developing
and maintaining work-based learning sites. Most employers
will prefer to have a single point of contact to maintain
and develop a relationship with schools.




Connect
Students With Work Sites




Follow
Up




Sustaining
Employer Relationships




Other
Ways to Say Thanks




Staying
in touch






 

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ASSESS
STUDENT LEARNING




 

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Student
progress and performance are measured by the degree to
which students meet the learning objectives outlined in
their personal learning plan. The assessment process should
document student learning, identify strengths and
weaknesses, and provide strategies for improvement. Various
tools used in assessment include portfolios,
supervisor or employer evaluations, performance
demonstrations at the work site, student self-evaluations,
and coordinator/instructor evaluations. If credit is
awarded, the assessment process may also provide a basis
for grading.



Students
find it useful to document their experiences, skills, and
accomplishments. A student portfolio containing this
information can serve as an ongoing assessment tool as well
as a "living" transcript.



Work-based
learning portfolios may include:




Evaluation
of progress and review of student objectives may be
accomplished through regular visits by the
coordinator/instructor to the work site and conferences
with the student's employer/supervisor.



The
following guidelines help make visits more
productive:




Record
keeping is necessary to:




Software
programs are available to make it easier to computerize
these records, generate comparative data, and produce a
variety of reports. Seek out programs designed specifically
for work-based learning or job placement. Check with
district technical support staff to determine which
programs are appropriate. It is important that forms are
approved by the appropriate school personnel to ensure
compliance with applicable laws and regulations. The types
of forms necessary will vary based on local needs.





 

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PROGRAM
EVALUATION




 

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Successful
work-based learning opportunities require on-going review and
evaluation. A well-planned evaluation will provide the
opportunity to analyze results that will be useful for making
changes or improvements in the program. A detailed
description of program evaluation can be found in the
Evaluation section of the WBL Manual.  



 

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WBL
Sections


VT Gold
Standards of WBL

 

      </td>
      <td align="left" valign="top">
        <p>
          <a href="/work-based-learning/what-is-wbl">
          What is Work-Based Learning?</a>
        </p>
      </td>
      <td align="left" valign="top">&nbsp;

      </td>
      <td align="left" valign="top">
        <strong>Schools:</strong><br />

        <a href="/work-based-learning/standard-1">Standard
        1</a><br />
        <a href="/work-based-learning/standard-2">Standard
        2</a>
      </td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td align="left" valign="top">&nbsp;

      </td>
      <td align="left" valign="top">&nbsp;

      </td>
      <td align="left" valign="top">&nbsp;

      </td>
      <td align="left" valign="top">&nbsp;

      </td>
      <td align="left" valign="top">&nbsp;

      </td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td align="left" valign="top">
        <strong>Employers:</strong><br />

        <a href="/work-based-learning/standard-3">Standard
        3</a>
      </td>
      <td align="left" valign="top">&nbsp;

      </td>
      <td align="left" valign="top">
        <strong>Students:</strong><br />

        <a href="/work-based-learning/standard-4">Standard
        4</a><br />
        <a href="/work-based-learning/standard-5">Standard
        5</a><br />
        <a href="/work-based-learning/standard-6">Standard
        6</a><br />
        <a href="/work-based-learning/standard-7">Standard
        7</a>
      </td>
      <td align="left" valign="top">&nbsp;

      </td>
      <td align="left" valign="top">
        <strong>Legal,
        Safety, Health:</strong><br />
        <a href="/work-based-learning/standard-8">Standard
        8</a>
      </td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td align="left" valign="top">&nbsp;

      </td>
      <td align="left" valign="top">&nbsp;

      </td>
      <td align="left" valign="top">&nbsp;

      </td>
      <td align="left" valign="top">&nbsp;

      </td>
      <td align="left" valign="top">&nbsp;

      </td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td align="left" valign="top">
        <strong>Types
        of WBL:</strong><br />
        <a href="/work-based-learning/job-shadow">Job
        Shadowing</a><br />
        <a href="/work-based-learning/unpaid-work">Unpaid Work
        Experience</a><br />
        <a href=
        "/work-based-learning/internship">Internship</a><br />
        <a href="/work-based-learning/paid-work">Paid Work
        Experience</a><br />
        <a href=
        "/work-based-learning/cooperative-work">Cooperative
        Work Experience</a><br />
        <a href=
        "/work-based-learning/apprenticeship">Apprenticeship</a><br />

        <a href=
        "/work-based-learning/supported-employment">Supported
        Employment</a><br />
        <a href="/work-based-learning/service-learning">Service
        Learning</a><br />
        <a href=
        "/work-based-learning/student-entrepreneurship">Student
        Entrepreneurship</a>
      </td>
      <td align="left" valign="top">&nbsp;

      </td>
      <td align="left" valign="top">
        <p>
          <a href="/work-based-learning/evaluation">Evaluation</a>
        </p>
      </td>
      <td align="left" valign="top">&nbsp;

      </td>
      <td align="left" valign="top">
        <p>
          <a href="/work-based-learning/resources">Resources</a>
        </p>
        <p>
          <a href=
          "/work-based-learning/acknowledgements">Acknowledgements</a>
        </p>
      </td>
    </tr>
  </table>
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Contact: 1343

Page Last Updated on March 21, 2014